Saint Andrew

 

St. Andrew was a fisherman who lived in Galilee during the time of Jesus.  He listened to John the Baptist's teachings and followed him on his mission.

Simon, Andrew's older brother, and Andrew gave up their work as fishermen to become apostles of Jesus.  Andrew was one of the first to be called. 

Andrew became a missionary, as the other apostles.  He preached about Jesus in the area around the Black Sea, northern Greece, Turkey, and Scythia (now the southern part of Russia.).

Andrew died as a martyr.  Stories say that in Patras, Greece, he was tied to a cross-shaped like a letter X.  Ever since then, a cross in the shape of an X has been called St. Andrew's cross. (note the wooden poles in the shape of an X in the picture).

His name is a Greek name meaning "courageous" or "manly".

St. Andrew is a patron of Russia, Scotland, the Greek Church, fishermen, and fish dealers.